Collaboration: whatgrandmawore and whatsaroxy

This post is the third in a collaborative project with Netherlands-based artist Roxy van Bemmel (@whatsaroxy). This scheme sees Bemmel interpret garments from museum collections through a contemporary and abstract eye. Historical context about the piece chosen for analysis is provided by whatgrandmawore. Painting of a woman with a 19th century evening dress from the … Continue reading Collaboration: whatgrandmawore and whatsaroxy

Collaboration: whatgrandmawore & whatsaroxy

This post is the second in a collaboration with whatgrandmawore and artist Roxy Van Bemmel, a project which sees Roxy visually interpret historical garments from online museum collections, whilst adding her own abstract and modern approach to object observation. Roxy van Bemmel painting of an 1818 evening dress from the Victoria and Albert Museum collection, … Continue reading Collaboration: whatgrandmawore & whatsaroxy

Underwater Wardrobe: The Uncanny Study of Tudor Clothing in Relation to the Dead in Museums

‘St Augustine says, “the dead are invisible, they are not absent.” You needn’t believe in ghosts to see that’s true […]. We sense the dead have a vital force still — they have something to tell us, something we need to understand.’ [1] The above quote was taken from Dame Hilary Mantel’s lecture The Day is For The … Continue reading Underwater Wardrobe: The Uncanny Study of Tudor Clothing in Relation to the Dead in Museums

Guest Post by Rachel Sayers: The History of Irish Dress 1850-1900

Our guest researcher and blogger Rachel Sayers returns to whatgrandmawore for a second post on Irish history! 'On Sundays at the Carnacun chapel the family [….] would pass by the men in knee breeches, frieze coats, and stovepipe hats; inside the church, the men sat on one side, the women hiding their faces behind shawls … Continue reading Guest Post by Rachel Sayers: The History of Irish Dress 1850-1900